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Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Internet2 Announce New High-Speed Network

The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Internet2 today announced plans to build an advanced research network for the Department of Energy as part of an effort to spur U.S. scientific advancement.

The network, which is being supported in part by a $62-million stimulus grant awarded to the national laboratory in 2009, will be able to carry data at 100 gigabits per second. That’s about 10 times faster than the lab’s present connections to other supercomputing sites. Internet2, the nonprofit networking consortium that connects research universities, will also work with the laboratory to create the cross-country network, which will build upon the lab’s Advanced Networking Initiative.

Steve Cotter, the head of Lawrence Berkeley’s Energy Sciences Network, said the new network will facilitate collaboration among researchers working with large databases.

“The high-energy physics community is basically constrained today by bandwidth,” said Mr. Cotter, referring specifically to researchers working with the Large Hadron Collider, which produces troves of data. The network should also help climate researchers exchange the large data sets needed for their models and simulations.

The network is expected to be completed at this time next year.



Department of Energy Builds National 100GigE Research Net

The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and Internet2 announced plans to build one of the world's fastest and most advanced scientific networks on behalf of the US Department of Energy (ESnet). Berkeley Lab has received $62 million in ...

Berkeley Lab preps 100 Gbps prototype network

Berkeley Lab is to start laying the foundations for a 100 Gbps academic research network, in a subcontract agreement with Internet2. Under the US Department of Energy's $62m long-term investment in high ...

Berkeley Lab and Internet2 consortium launch world's fastest network

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Internet2 consortium plan to build a blistering fast network for the Energy Department that can transmit data at the rate of 100 gigabits per second to support scientific research. ...

Berkeley Lab Lays Foundation for 100 Gbps Network

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) today announced a major step toward creating one of the world’s fastest scientific networks to accelerate research in fields ranging from advanced energy solutions to particle physics.

100G Ethernet to power Department of Energy network

‎A new national 100Gbps prototype network being built for the Department of Energy will provide about a tenfold increase in speed for labs doing research together on topics such as clean energy and climate ...

Energy building 100-gigabit/sec network to handle data 'explosion'

The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Internet2 advanced networking consortium announced July 13 plans to build a prototype 100-gigabits/sec prototype network as the first step toward an eventual terabit-speed network. ...

Berkeley Lab, Internet2 to Build 100 Gbps Prototype Scientific Network

The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and Internet2 today announced an agreement to build one of the world's fastest and most advanced scientific networks to further accelerate US .

Supercomputer Data Network Links Researchers at Blazing Download Speeds

The ANI network will also jump-start ESnet's research in support of "green" energy-efficient networking – a hot priority as data volumes and network and supercomputing center energy demands keep rising. With Berkeley Lab's commitment to lead efforts in ...

Internet 2 and Berkeley Lab to build 100 Gb/s network for the Department of Energy

ESNet and Internet2 have built a networking test bed for ideas that are too disruptive for the networks that people actually use.

Our Internet is Breaking Down. Here's the Path to a New One

The Internet is breaking down. And we’ll need something new. After all, our “information superhighway“ requires maintenance just like real roads do. And now it’s showing its age, buckling under the pressure of a content and traffic explosion. We take this technology for granted, yet someone has to tend to it. Enter Internet2, a consortium of experts from research and education communities and the U.S. government, and the Energy Sciences Network (ESNet), a network linking scientists at national laboratories and research institutions, who collaborate on some of the world’s most important scientific challenges like energy, climate science, and the origins of the universe. These two groups are now experimenting with new ways to improve the Internet.

Berkeley Lab and Campus Researchers Honored for Information Technology Innovation

Recipients of the Larry L. Sautter Award, including UC Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory researchers, were honored for their innovative uses of information technology at a conference on Monday.

Superspeed Internet Pipeline Could Speed Innovation

Answering the challenge of exploding amounts of data, Berkeley Lab and Internet2 announced an agreement in July to build one of the world's fastest and most advanced scientific networks to further accelerate US competitiveness in science and technology.

Scientists Discover an "Instant Cosmic Classic Supernova"

A supernova discovered August 24 is closer to Earth -- approximately 21 million light-years away -- than any other of its kind in a generation. Astronomers believe they caught the supernova within hours of its explosion, a rare feat made possible with a specialized survey telescope and state-of-the-art computational tools.... As soon as the observations are taken, the data travels more than 400 miles to NERSC via the National Science Foundation's High Performance Wireless Research and Education Network and DOE's Energy Sciences Network (ESnet)....

Scientists Discover an "Instant Cosmic Classic Supernova"

A supernova discovered Wednesday is closer to Earth — approximately 21 million light-years away — than any other of its kind in a generation. Astronomers believe they caught the supernova within hours of its explosion, a rare feat made possible with a specialized survey telescope and state-of-the-art computational tools.

SDSC announces scalable, high-performance data storage cloud Web-based system offers high durability, security, and speed for diverse user base

The San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at the University of California, San Diego, today announced the launch of what is believed to be the largest academic-based cloud storage system in the U.S., specifically designed for researchers, students, academics, and industry users who require stable, secure, and cost-effective storage and sharing of digital information, including extremely large data sets.

Supercomputing center targets big, fast storage cloud at academics, industry

A storage cloud with 10 Gigabit Ethernet speed and scalability to hundreds of petabytes has been launched to provide virtually unlimited storage capacity to supercomputing customers.

Built by the San Diego Supercomputer Center at UC San Diego, the SDSC Cloud has 5.5PB to begin with, but “is scalable by orders of magnitude to hundreds of petabytes, with aggregate performance and capacity both scaling almost linearly with growth,” the SDSC say

Internet2 Names IDEA Award Winners From University of Virginia, IUPUI, ESnet, UC San Diego and Columbia University

A team from the Department of Energy's Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory won an IDEA award for their application, On-Demand Secure Circuits and Advance Reservation System (OSCARS).

DOE Completes First Transcontinental 100 Gig Network Connection

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) announced today the completion of the world’s first transcontinental 100 Gigabit per second (Gbps) network connection.

New Ultra-High Speed Network Connection for Researchers and Educators is 10 Times Faster Than Commercial Internet Providers

Washington, D.C. – U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced the activation of an ultra-high speed network connection for scientists, researchers and educators at universities and National Laboratories that is at least ten times faster than commercial Internet providers. The project – funded with $62 million from the 2009 economic stimulus law – is intended for research use but could pave the way for widespread commercial use of similar technology.

Internet2, ESnet take 100-Gbps coast to coast

Internet2, ESnet take 100-Gbps coast to coast

by Lightwave Staff Administrators of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) and the Internet2 research and education network say they have completed the world's first transcontinental deployment of 100-Gbps technology. ...

HPC Innovator Series: Steve Cotter

As science becomes more data-intensive, whether due to massive amounts of data collected by experimental facilities or increasingly detailed simulations on supercomputers, that same research is in turn increasingly reliant on networking. For most of its 25 years, the Department of Energy’s Energy Sciences Network, better known as ESnet, has been a critical but relatively quiet component in supporting DOE’s research missions.

That began to change about four years ago when ESnet deployed its Science Data Network, a system that could be configured to provide dedicated end-to-end virtual circuits to accommodate the direct transfer of massive datasets. Other innovative services followed, including perfSONAR, a set of tools for diagnosing and defeating network bottlenecks, and OSCARS, an online system for easily reserving these end-to-end connections for large-scale data transfers.

The stage was set for the next level of innovative networking in August 2008, when Steve Cotter left Google to become just the third person to lead ESnet.

ESnet, Orange Silicon Valley, and Bay Microsystems Demonstrate the World’s First Long Distance 40Gbps RDMA Data Transfer

Source:biowire

Researchers at the Department of Energy’s Energy Sciences Network (ESnet), Orange Silicon Valley and Bay Microsystems have collaborated to showcase the world’s first 40 Gbps (gigabits per second) wide area network demonstration of RDMA over InfiniBand. RDMA, or Remote Direct Memory Access, is an alternative model to TCP/IP for bulk data transfer designed to significantly improve the utilization of available bandwidth resources and the processing efficiency of the end hosts – and does so without the need for any special network tuning.

http://www.hpcwire.com/hpcwire/2011-10-25/esnet,_orange_silicon_valley,_and_bay_microsystems_demonstrate_first_long_distance_40_gbps_rdma_data_transfer.html



SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, BERKELEY AND FREMONT, Calif., Oct. 25 -- Researchers at the Department of Energy’s Energy Sciences Network (ESnet), Orange Silicon Valley and Bay Microsystems have collaborated to showcase the world’s first 40 Gbps (gigabits per second) wide area network demonstration of RDMA over InfiniBand. RDMA, or Remote Direct Memory Access, is an alternative model to TCP/IP for bulk data transfer designed to significantly improve the utilization of available bandwidth resources and the processing efficiency of the end hosts – and does so without the need for any special network tuning.

LGS router will accomodate 10-fold boost in DOE data traffic

Network specialists LGS Innovations is teaming with the Energy Department to build a nationwide 100 gigabit per second Ethernet network thanks to a $62 million grant from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, which will pay for the project.

The Advanced Networking Initiative is a project of DOE’s Energy Sciences Network, or ESnet, according to an Oct. 19 announcement from the Herndon, Va., company.

The 100GE is the next standard capacity leap in high broadband network connectivity, supporting 100 gigabits per second over the network, a significant improvement over most current standard networks that connect with speeds of 10GE or 40GE, a company public relations executive explained.

LGS partners with the DOE in $62m grant

As part of the Advanced Networking Initiative, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act has granted $62 million for LGS Innovations and the Energy Department's Ethernet network, according to Washington Technology.

DOE announces 100 Gbps Network

The US Department of Energy will next month demonstrate an upgrade to the ESnet academic network that will take its speed up to 100 Gbps.

The project – funded with $62 million raised through the 2009 economic stimulus law – is intended for research use but could pave the way for widespread commercial use of similar technology, the department says.

"While this breakthrough will make sharing information between our labs much more efficient, its potential goes far beyond that," says secretary of energy Steven Chu.

DOE announces 100 Gbps Network

US Agency Demos 100 Gbps Network

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U.S. agency demos 100 Gbps network
U.S. agency demos 100 Gbps network
By: Carolyn Duffy Marsan On: 01 Nov 2011 For: Network World Creator
The Department of Energy will show off its upgrade this month to the Engery Sciences Network that will up throughput by 10 times
FRAMINGHAM, Mass. -- The U.S. Department of Energy is about to debut one of the fastest networks ever built: a 100 Gbps Ethernet network that will enable researchers to create more complex, real-world simulations in climate change, particle physics, astronomy and other scientific fields.

DOE is demonstrating its 100G upgrade to the Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) at a supercomputing conference being held in Seattle from Nov. 12-18. Previously, ESnet provided 10Gbps links.

"Since 1990, our traffic has grown by a factor of 10 every 47 months on average," explained Steve Cotter, ESnet department head. "We are in the age of observation right now in science. All of these scientific instruments and experiments are collecting significantly more data than they ever have in the past. This data needs to be stored ... and moved around. We've been using this 10 Gigabit network ... but we knew that if we didn't start planning now for a 100 Gigabit network, the demand would overwhelm us.''

ESnet marks 25 years of service to science

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Here is ESnet’s idea of a 25th birthday bash: testing the ultimate high-speed network, a 100-gigabits-per-second (Gbps) prototype intended to meet the ever-increasing data demands of large-scale, collaborative science.

This year marks a quarter century since the founding of the Department of Energy’s ESnet – Energy Sciences Network – based at DOE’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and sponsored by the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) in the Office of Science.

ESnet Marks 25 Years of Service to Science

Computational science administrators and users reflect on 25 years of ESnet, the data network that ties 25,000 scientists to Department of Energy laboratories, computers and instruments. This anniversary year, ESnet celebrates an upgrade to carry even more data even faster.

3 DOE labs now connected with ultra-high speed network

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is now supporting scientific research at unprecedented bandwidth speeds – at least ten times faster than commercial Internet providers – with a new network that connects thousands of researchers using three of the world's top supercomputing centers in California, Illinois and Tennessee. The new network will be officially unveiled today in Seattle, Washington, at the gala opening of SC11, the premier international conference on high performance computing, networking, storage and analysis, where DOE researchers will use the network for groundbreaking climate data transfers and astrophysics visualizations.

"With the establishment of this high speed network, the United States is once again blazing a path for the future of Internet innovations," said Secretary of Energy Steven Chu. "Initially, this breakthrough will make sharing information between our labs much more efficient and pave the way for new discoveries, but it also holds the potential to change and improve our lives much like the original commercialization of the Internet did in the mid-90s."

Orange Silicon Valley, ESnet, InfiniBand Trade Association and OpenFabrics Alliance Demonstrate the First Long Distance, Multi-Stream 40Gbps RDMA Data Transfers at SC11

Demo Leverages ESnet's Transcontinental Advanced Networking Research Initiative (ANI) Testbed and Multi-Vendor Participation to Demonstrate RDMA-Enabled Data Transfer, Spanning Approximately 7,000 Miles

New 100 Gbps Network will Keep America on the Cutting Side of Innovation

A new prototype network built by the Energy Department’s Energy Sciences Network (ESnet), will allow scientists to share, analyze and visualize complex information quicker than ever before. The Advanced Networking Initiative (ANI) transmits at about 100 Gigabits per second (Gbps), which is about 10 times faster than most commercial Internet providers, and approximately 50,000 times faster than scientists (or anyone else) can send information via their iPhones. 
 


It won’t make for conversations that are 50,000 times faster than normal, but it will provide the opportunity for greater insight into scientific and societal challenges. Today’s complex scientific experiments produce vast amounts of information. Therefore, the need for new capacity and for greater connectivity to transmit this information is very real. 



The ANI gives National Laboratory scientists the ability to pull information from specialized research centers, and then analyze it using the Energy Department’s supercomputers, which are some of the most powerful in the world. The ability to further leverage these resources will lead to more scientific discoveries, from understanding of the most basic building blocks of matter to investigating the genetic causes of diseases and searching for more effective treatments.

Fast Science: DOE turns on its 100 gigabit data network

http://gcn.com/articles/2011/11/17/doe-launches-100-gigabit-data-network.aspx

RENCI and Duke to build experimental network

NSF-funded ExoGENI project will enable scientists to test and evaluate networking infrastructure for the future Internet.

ESnet Offers National Dark Fiber Testbed Resources to GreenTouch Members to Spur Innovation

Dark fiber testbed, part of ESnet's Advanced Networking Initiative (ANI), will enable members to test energy-efficiency innovations and radical new designs in networking technologies

Worlds first demonstration of a RDMA-enabled data transfer..

Seattle, Washington – November 14, 2011 – Today at Supercomputing 2011 (SC11), the international conference for high performance computing, networking, storage and analysis, researchers from Orange Silicon Valley, The Department of Energy’s Energy Sciences Network (ESnet), InfiniBand Trade Association (IBTA) and OpenFabrics Alliance (OFA) join forces with the SC11 conference network SCinet to showcase the world’s first demonstration of a Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA)-enabled data transfer at 40 Gigabits per second (Gbps) over wide area network links spanning approximately 7,000 miles.



Network Upgrades Meet the Need for Speed

While the commercial Internet is growing at a staggering rate, it has nothing on the Energy Sciences Network. ESnet, managed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory for the Energy Department, links tens of thousands of scientists at laboratories, universities and other research institutions around the world. The 25-year-old network, which lets scientists collaborate on complex issues including energy, climate science and the origin of the universe, moves petabytes of data each month — and the amount of data continues to grow at a rate of 70 percent each year.

Keeping up with that demand requires power, reliability, scalability and speed. The latest major contribution to keeping the network fast and reliable is a new transcontinental 100-gigabits-per-second infrastructure. The paths between the major Energy Department supercomputing facilities are currently operating in prototype mode, and the ESnet team will transition its production network to the new infrastructure this year.

Energy Research Network Reaches 100 Gbps

Writing in the October issue of IEEE Spectrum, Ariel Bleicher describes the science drivers behind ESnet’s move to a 100 gigabit-per-second network. “When the new 100-gigabit-per-second Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) goes live next month, it will be the world’s fastest continent-spanning science network. But this distinction will probably be temporary: Research networks around the world are in the midst of their own big upgrades,” wrote Bleicher. “Now more than ever, science depends on the ability to quickly and reliably move massive amounts of data over great distances. Breakthrough predictions and discoveries, such as climate change and exoplanets, rarely happen at one institution anymore. This summer’s sighting of a particle resembling the Higgs boson, for instance, required sharing about 26 petabytes of data per year among more than 150 computing centers in 36 countries.” Read the full article. (link to http://spectrum.ieee.org/telecom/internet/energy-research-network-reaches-100-gbps)